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TOPIC: 2018 Schedule - October Topics

2018 Schedule - October Topics 16 Dec 2017 07:49 #4347

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Back Lighting
The subject must be back lit - either natural light or another light source can be used
Position of the Sun: It is essential to choose where in your frame you want to place the sun or light source – only thereafter it is possible to get the exposure right.
Basically, there are three options: The sun or light source behind the subject, outside the frame or in the actual shot. The last option is the most difficult, since it gets considerably harder to compose the shot.
A good alternative is to place the sun just outside the frame or partly behind the subject.
It is a good idea to keep the majority of the sun blocked and avoid too much light. In order to create the desired golden outline, you do not necessarily have to wait for the golden hour.
It is advantageous to have your lens in the shade. A lens hood is useful while shooting with backlighting.
Camera Settings: First, aperture. Use a wide aperture in order to achieve the characteristic lens flare. Likewise, it gives a shallow depth of field. The aperture varies from f/2.8 to maximum f/5.6.
When shooting with a strong backlight you definitely want to use the manual settings. The picture has to be significantly overexposed, otherwise the subject will turn out completely dark and the background/sky correctly lit.
Therefore, select your wide aperture and experiment with the shutter speed. Try to take a few shots with auto settings just to get a sense of where to start experimenting. Mostly it varies from 1/100 to 1/640 seconds.
Another way of finding the right shutter speed is to measure the light with the spot metering. Here the camera will only measure a small area of the photograph – point at your subject and avoid underexposure.
Second, the camera’s focus. One of the hardest parts of shooting the perfect backlit portrait is control the focus. Cameras are definitely not very fond of shooting against the sun – frequently the autofocus does not work at all.
You might look in the viewfinder just to realize that you are completely blinded, and cannot see your subject by any chance. This is one of the most problematic parts of shooting with backlighting.
Give up trying to make it work with autofocus; it is an extremely time-consuming process. Either get the subject to block the sun and get your autofocus right in order to shift to manual, or simply try to adjust the focus and keep a fixed distance to the model.
Third, keep your ISO as low as possible. There will be plenty of light to work with.
Open
Any Subject that us treated pictorially, embodying the elements of good design, arrangement or composition. The print must be a monochromatic colour. NOT Black & White.
Photographers can do great photography anywhere; however, it sometimes can take a little inspiration to get the wheels turning. The most important thing is to walk out the door frequently. If you think you are not going to capture any interesting images then you are not going to walk out the door.
Take a long walk, anywhere, at any time, and challenge yourself to capture an interesting image.
As an “Open” subject try to challenge yourself to explore topics and genres that you don’t normally venture into.
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The following user(s) said Thank You: MikeB, DebbieS

2018 Schedule - October Topics 29 Dec 2017 00:14 #4378

Thanks Dennis - very helpful and much appreciated -am feeling inspired!
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The following user(s) said Thank You: Bear, Chris dB

2018 Schedule - October Topics 29 Dec 2017 10:53 #4383

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Thanks Marilyn,
Appreciate feedback.
As it is a new initiative we need the feedback to evaluate the need for this type of guidance notes and to improve it.
Dennis
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2018 Schedule - October Topics 14 Jan 2018 12:07 #4439

I have a question about the wording "Mono, not black and white"
Is the intention to mean that mono does not have to be black and white, but any singular colour through to white?
or, is it that black and white is not allowed and that the image must be a singular colour through to white?
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2018 Schedule - October Topics 14 Jan 2018 12:29 #4440

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Richard,
I will leave the official reply to Jodie or Alyson but my take is that as you have interpreted the description.
Not Black & White, hence something like Sepia, or Blue toning etc., is what they are after.
But I stand to be corrected.
Dennis
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