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An area for discussion on the up and coming exhibition topics

TOPIC: 2018 Schedule - September Topics

2018 Schedule - September Topics 16 Dec 2017 07:55 #4348

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Predominantly White
An image about a white subject in which the subject comprises significantly more than 50% of the image.
There are many shades of 'white' (think of white flowers, snow, ice, bride’s dresses) - and they can difficult to photograph as it is important not to blow out highlights and retain texture and detail.
The theme is “predominately” white. A touch of colour can sometimes help in emphasizing the larger portion of the image that is white. Hence the use of colour can attract the viewers’ attention to the predominantly white portion of the image.
Occupations
An image showing a person in an occupation which cannot be classed as a hobby, pastime, recreation, sport or play. The subject needs to be shown to be intent on the work they are doing and not interacting with the photographer.
Be aware that people are doing their jobs and making a living. If the photography seems to be getting on their nerves, or you're getting in the way, either change the way you're working, or move on. If there are customers, it can be still more sensitive.
Approach people with confidence and humour; people will often respond more positively. Nobody owes you a picture and some people will instinctively mistrust you. Your challenge is to gain their trust. Also remember that people at work can be suspicious of "snoopers" and may well assume you're up to no good or use a candid shot if it adds to the image.
Find a location that you think has potential, and spend some time there, getting to know what goes on. It's really all about people-watching and just being observant.
Safety, check what is going on around you.
A standard portrait lens is between 50mm and 100mm in length. These are generally the best focal lengths for capturing faces, because they don’t add distortion and they depict your subject in the most natural, accurate way. But if your goal is to capture some context as well—which is essential when photographing people at work—then you’ll also need to bring along a wider angle lens. Finally, don’t leave your telephoto lens at home because it can be useful for capturing important details—and it’s also essential if your subject works in a hazardous area such as a working cattle ranch or on a road crew.
Including background might clutter and make the image too busy but it can also add context and location. Consider what you need to include.
Seasons
An image that clearly portrays a season and how the photographer feels about that season. For example, a photographer may despise the heat of summer so portrays this through showing a sun baked scorched environment or they may love it and shows an inviting seascape)
There is a reason why this topic is in September, to allow several seasons to pass before the exhibition date. So, this is a topic you need to start thinking off as from the start of the photography year.
Check the weather constantly as it could give a more dramatic effect to the image and help convey the feelings of the season.
If you find a suitable subject, consider how it is going to look in seasons to come or at different times of the day or night, in order to extract the maximum impact to convey the season.
That luscious tree you shot in the summer? Go back to it in winter and capture the twists of the barren branches after the last of the leaves have fallen. You’ll find yourself with two dramatically contrasting photos of the same location. Revisit your favourite places at different times of the year, so that you can truly emphasize the way they evolve with each season.
Utilise colour to emphasise the season.
Taking spring and summer photos against a bright blue sky will really make your colours pop, while spring showers will offer more subdued colours and a different mood. Carefully consider your exposure when photographing autumn leaves. You can maintain your depth of field by pushing the ISO and using a high shutter speed.
Think of your favourite places that are nearby, places you can get to easily. What are they like at different times of the year? How can you show those differences? It might your photography a new focus, give it a try. I’ve been doing it for the last couple of years and it’s amazing how you can get very different images from the same location.
If you have an area that you love photographing but feel as though you have exhausted it, consider documenting the change throughout the seasons with your camera.
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