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2021 Schedule - February Topics

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14 Dec 2020 10:47 #7566 by Bear
2021 Schedule - February Topics was created by Bear
NOTE: remember that these two topics are "Click West Topics" too and it is advisable to read the WAPF competition rules to ensure that the entries abide by those rules.

Projected – Portrait (Click West Topic)
An image of a person, or part thereof, with a shadow/s forming a significant compositional component. A silhouette is not acceptable.

This topic implies to me that we will be working in a low lighting or light that comes across the subject giving dark areas of exposure.
As you might have guessed, shooting in low light is not always easy to do, but sometimes you may be looking for a certain effect or just in a dark environment that requires you pull on your photography knowledge to land the best shot.
While low light conditions come in many forms, ranging from virtually no light (like a pitch-black room) to an ambient lit reception hall, the first thing to do is evaluate your environment. If there are any areas at all giving off good light to work with, moving your portrait subject into this light can help your portrait session immensely. We find this often with barn wedding venues, where many spaces are dimly lit, yet there may be ample usable light right next to a window or door. A quick movement of the shoot to this area, and in a matter of a few test shots, we can be on our way to taking great quality portrait photos.
Needless to say, that focus and depth of field play a very important part in the composition of this type of portrait, adding a source of light to focus will be of great assistance.
There are a lot of different ways you can impact your photos in low light in order to capture the best possible images. Within your camera itself, you have the ability to influence the shutter speed, ISO, and aperture to enable more light in your pictures. In addition, external flashes and static light sources can be used to add light artificially to a scene.
Creativity, light direction, environment or implied environment that is suitable to the posing subject can make or break the intent or message that the photographer is trying to convey.


Print – (Black & White Only) – Abstract (Click West Topic)
An abstract image derived from an industrial / architectural / Machine Source.

It is worth pointing out that this topic is only in Black & White not Monochrome.
Black and White is the following:
“A black and white photograph is an image where all colour has been removed (either in the digital process or through the choice of film). It consists of shades of grey tone that generally go from dark (black) to light (white).”
NOTE: remember we are trying to create an abstract image by using the medium of Black & White Photography.
Abstract photography and abstract art are about shapes, forms, patterns, textures, proximity (zoom) and particularly in black and white images abstract is all about tonal range.
Be aware that not all images will translate well to black and white. So, look at all the elements and deduce what else you have to work with, besides color, consider some of these elements required for a great photo, include contrast, texture, lighting, shape, and form.
While black and white photography still has an important role in photography, please note that not all subjects translate well to this mode. It is good to know when to use black and white.
Let your creativity run loose.
As an “Open Abstract” subject try to challenge yourself to explore this topic with creativity.
Photographers can do great photography anywhere; however, the most important thing is to walk out the door frequently. If you think you are not going to capture any interesting images then you are not going to walk out the door.
Take a long walk, anywhere, at any time, and challenge yourself to capture an interesting image.
We all feel and see things differently, in theory black and white photography brings out more emotions and a deeper meaning to a photograph, because all that remains in black and white photographs is subject and form. It makes you focus on what the photograph is, not the colours surrounding the subject. I think because the world is in colour and it’s a very colourful world. When we see a colour photograph it is just a repetition of what we see in the world around. However, a black and white photograph isn’t what we see it’s what lies beneath the colour and leaves subject and form baring the soul. You see meaning in something that you would normally walk past on a daily basis. Black and White brings out tones and dynamics because that’s all there is physically as black and white means one-tone. Black and White brings everything down to its simplest form but in doing so it can bring everything to its most complex.
The 5 corner stones of Black and White photography are:
• Contrast
• Tone
• Shadow
• Shape
• Texture
These apply to all Black and White photography including in Abstract images. These elements are very powerful especially in architectural, industrial or machine source.
Black & white photography can help establish an abstract, or semi-abstract, photographic composition because it can help eliminate distractions, and it strips the photo down to the bare essentials! When you're evaluating an image for potential conversion to black and white, ask yourself how important is the use of colour? If you remove the colour, does it strengthen or weaken the overall story and impact of the shot? Evaluating this on your own, prior to displaying it to others, will help your viewers understand your intent.

If you are a photographer living in an urban area, it’s hard not to be drawn in by the structures that surround you. Interesting architecture or mechanical objects makes for a fine subject too: it doesn’t move, it can look wildly different depending on the time of day, and there are plenty of tiny details hidden within that might be missed by the average passer-by.
Look for abstractions within a single structure or objects. Ensure that your images never come across as a straight building or object, by dialling into certain details of the form show your viewers something more complex and interesting.
Look for the shapes and the structure look at light, shapes, negative space and the positive space. When you see it, you will know exactly what you need to photograph.
Look out for those elements to inspire you.
Do not rush, you might have to go back a few times to get the light that will make the image. Spend some time just studying the light from morning to night, the shadows and the texture on the structure or objects which changes throughout the day
One of the challenges in shooting architectural, industrial or machine source images is looking after the highlights.
Look at the abstract sides of the building or object don't look at the building or object as a whole, look at pieces of the building or object that will compose an interesting image. If the building or object has leading lines use them.
Looking out for all of the individual shapes and how the negative and positive space interact to make up the larger structure.
Consider the different perspectives.
Start visualizing abstract images. First of all, you have to take your camera and start shooting — it’s very difficult to really have an idea on how your “abstract subject” will look like just speculating without the camera — so take your camera, start shooting and ignore the subject! look for interesting shapes (2D and 3D), look for appealing patterns and textures, get close to your “subject”, actually some of the best abstract images have been captured using macro lenses.
Some elements of abstract photography – Simplicity, Composition, Angle of View, Lighting, Harmony and Mystery.
View the scene that you wish to create through the sunglasses (or the filter). The dark lens will help remove colour, and make the background (subject) appear in shades of tone versus coloured hues.
This simple step alone will improve your attempts at black N white photography.

NOTE: Composition is important no matter if the image is black & white or colour. But it’s the “tools” of composition that can vary based on which medium (colour or B&W) that you’re choosing. A good tool of composition for a colour photograph may not apply to a monochrome photograph of the same scene. This can be very important, especially if your plan is to convert the colour image to a black and white image in post-production.
Black & white photography can help establish an abstract, or semi-abstract, photographic composition because it can help eliminate distractions, and it strips the photo down to the bare essentials! When you're evaluating an image for potential conversion to black and white, ask yourself how important is the use of colour? If you remove the colour, does it strengthen or weaken the overall story and impact of the shot? Evaluating this on your own, prior to displaying it to others, will help your viewers understand your intent.
The key here is how to apply the 5 cornerstones to the particular situation and subject matter to create an image that is creative and captivating by using the key elements of black and white photography.
Although details or parts of industrial, architectural or machine source images fit in well with the abstract theme consider actually photographing the whole building. It’s not just about finding clever details of light and shade, but describing a building, machine or industrial building in an artistic abstract way, if so remember to use depth as an element of the image, after all these are three dimensional objects.

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26 Feb 2021 17:53 #7742 by Jodie D
Replied by Jodie D on topic 2021 Schedule - February Topics
Hi All

Our January projected judge was Calre Day. Her critique is attached.

Our print judge was Christie Lyn. She has a facebook page  Christie Lyn - Equine Photographer . website  www.christielyn.com.au/
Her contact details are: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., 0412 553 202

 

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The following user(s) said Thank You: Bear, MikeB

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